BRICCO has a dark little Secret

in #life
3 months ago

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photo by Joey SLLiks

The relatively ancient city of Boston has a very long, complicated, and interesting history. In the mid 1800s the city grew about 3 times in size. It did this primarily by adding landfill (from the nearby town of Needham Ma as well as the majority of the actual hill known as Beacon Hill) to the vast marsh connecting Boston to neighboring Roxbury.

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The neighboring city of Quincy still has a significant amount of this Marshland in the Neponset watershed area.

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photo by Joey SLLiks

Much of Boston's landscape was marshy wetlands until this giant landfill project from the mid 1800s. It wasn't long after this time that The city also began importing Italians into the Neighborhood.

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As the story goes the Genoans came first, then the Campanians, Sicilians, Neapolitans and Abruzzesians among others. It has been said that the population of North End Italians went from 14000 in 1900 to 44,000 in 1930. The 1930's population had transitioned to a 99% Italian immigrant residency, in the formerly Jewish then Irish, North End of Boston.

It was also around this time that Italy was first unified and nationalized, and Pasta drowned in meaty, traditional Bolognesian gravy, had somehow became the national dish. The North End was home to a number of spaghetti houses such as the Prince Spaghetti House ,

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located on Prince Street, which is probably the most well known of seemingly hundreds, of restaurant ghosts of the past(a). To this day the Prince house noodles have yet to relinquish their highly coveted status as "household brand", especially after the iconic 1970's television commercial which featured supposed first generation American, " the late Anthony Martignetti" running through the local bocce court to get some Weednesday night Spaghetti.

Currently, most of the Italian families have left the North End. In place of the former shoe stores, grocery markets and barber salons, are restaurants....

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photo by Joey SLLiks

Lots and lots of restaurants. Boston's North End has so many great restaurants and because it is one of the older parts of town, has a very distinct colonial appearance.

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Paul Revere's House is here as is the famous Old North Church of the Revolutionary war.

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So are the 2 bakeries most involved in the Canoli War. Mike's and Modern are both bakeries on Hanover st and are hard places to gain access to without running the gauntlet of waiting in line outdoors here, in the typically chilly, ocean front part of town.

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Also on Hanover Street is the very popular restaurant Bricco.

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photo by Joey SLLiks

Bricco is a very well respected restaurant and one typically needs a reservation

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photo by Joey SLLiks

to get in on a Friday or Saturday night,

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especially now.

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photo by Joey SLLiks

Let it be known ...Bricco has a dark little secret.

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photo by Joey SLLiks

It's this alley way that leads to their bakery

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photo by Joey SLLiks

Well it's not exactly a secret

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but it is awesome

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photo by Joey SLLiks

at the end of the most fragrant alley of bread in the world you come to

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photo by Joey SLLiks

an award winning bakery and a quaint authentic Italian groceria, the Bricco Salumaria

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photo by Joey SLLiks

As good as the actual Bricco restaurant is

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Bricco Salumaria is no slouch either.

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photo by Joey SLLiks

I love this place. No reservation needed and the whole corridor smells of freshly backed artisan breads.

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photo by Joey SLLiks

Usually there is not much of a line but while you're waiting for your giant sandwich it's fun to look around at all of the imported items.

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photo by Joey SLLiks

The subs here are out of control.

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photo by Joey SLLiks

For like 10 bucks it's enough to feed 2 people

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or 1 who is super baked, making bad volume of consumption decisions.

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Also a great place to get grated cheese, hard salamis,

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and imported products from boot nation.

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photo by Joey SLLiks

Plus you can't pahk a cah here so you are almost forced to walk off that sub on Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway,

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photo by Joey SLLiks

the most obvious place to smoke some time honored cannabis on the way back to your car in preparation for that Boston Traffic.

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Bricco and it's Salumeria....highly Recomended

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photo by Joey SLLiks



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